IRV MAGRI

 

 

 

CRIMEFIGHTERS was founded in January of 1993 by Irvin L. Magri, Jr.

Mr. Magri served as a New Orleans Police Cadet, Officer, Detective and Supervisor before his retirement on January 6, 1982.  Magri was the Honor Graduate in Class # 35 of the New Orleans Police Academy and graduated from Loyola University on May 22, 1970 with a degree in Criminology and a minor in Sociology.

He is the Founder and Past President of the Police Association of New Orleans (PANO).  Magri founded this first Police Union in the history of the South on July 28, 1969 with 13 total officers attending that very historic meeting at the Police and Fireman’s Hall located at 410 Basin Street. Under Magri’s leadership, the Police Association of New Orleans grew to over 1,000 members within the framework of the New Orleans Police Department. Irv also served from 1968 to 1970 as the elected President of the Police and Fireman’s Holy Name Society. He is a Criminologist, a Retired NOPD Supervisor, a Former Chairman of the Louisiana Pardon Board, a Former Member of the Louisiana Parole Board, a Former Chairman of the Governor Anti-Narcotics Speakers Bureau, a Former Assistant Chief of Police (GIPD), a Former Member of the Violent Crime and Homicide Governor’s Task Force.  He authored the book “Major Problems of the American Police” in 1970. He also served as the State President of the Louisiana Police State Central Committee from 1969 to 1976 representing 22 police unions with over 3,000 commissioned officers as members on a statewide basis.  He retired undefeated from both of these positions. He is the host of the radio show “Crimewave” (1967-to present). (LINK)

During Irv Magri’s law enforcement career he was extremely sensitive to the plight of these poor innocent and productive citizens who did not always understand our criminal justice system. He realized early in his law enforcement career that the actual victims of violent crime was not being represented properly in the Criminal Justice System and was often the “forgotten voice” . Irv saw the absolute frustration on the part of victims of violent crime and in fact they were often not even consulted when criminal charges were either drastically reduced or even more shockingly dropped completely with no notification to the actual victim.